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Why Your Window Warranty Should Cover Broken Glass

your window warranty should cover broken glass

Everybody likes a new car warranty.

Besides being included for free, new car warranties have high-perceived value because it’s easy for people to imagine a disaster. All vehicles have a decent chance of messing up somehow, and the cost to repair it can be catastrophically expensive.

Warranties on electronics are a little different.

Many electronics are so cheap and unlikely to break that the value of a warranty is low.

Seriously… why pay $24.99 for a five-year warranty on a $100 printer? It’s just easier to buy a new printer.

Conversely, it’s probably worth the extra seven bucks per month for a full replacement warranty on your high-school daughter’s $700 iPhone. It’s almost guaranteed to be dropped multiple times, fall into a swimming pool, or get misplaced at the mall sometime within its two-year contract.

So for electronics, the perceived value of the warranty depends on the perceived threat (or lack of threat) of large repair bills.

This brings us to your window warranty.

It’s hard for a homeowner to envision the exact kinds of things that can go wrong with their new windows (this also goes for home improvement projects like siding, roofing, kitchens, and so on).

So when you tell a customer your windows have a 25-year warranty, it doesn’t mean much to them.

They don’t “get” things like defects in exterior cladding, missing flashing, and damaged glazing. And in the event that something does go wrong, your customer believes it will be so far in the future that it’s not worth worrying about right now.

So your awesome warranty becomes just another semi-meaningless bullet point on a list of cool features you offer… unless your warranty covers glass breakage.

Everybody can relate to broken glass. Who hasn’t had to deal with a broken window in their life?

They’re like flat tires—it’s not a matter of “if,” but “when.”

And that’s the beauty of covering broken glass in your window warranty.

It’s the one thing that no one would expect to be included in a warranty. Broken windows are almost always the customer’s fault; nobody would ever expect YOU to cover THEIR carelessness.

Which is exactly what makes glass-breakage coverage so powerful.

Yes, powerful.

Think about it…

By warranting broken glass, you have a unique selling advantage against the competition.

When prospects hear about it, they’ll instantly form an image in their heads of a baseball or football or golf ball crashing through a window.

And then they’ll be amazed that you’ll fix it. No questions. No cost.

But wait… won’t you get annihilated on service requests?

No. Here’s why…

Surprisingly, few customers will take you up on the offer.

Some won’t remember that you offer it.

Others might be embarrassed to request free service because they know the broken window was their fault.

And, to be perfectly honest, there just aren’t THAT many broken windows.

Case in point…

One of my clients has been offering a broken glass warranty for about 18 years. He’s installed windows for over 3,000 customers.

Guess how many service calls he gets per year to fix broken glass?

About four. PER YEAR.

To make the repair, it costs him about a hundred bucks (glass and labor included).

Most customers expect to pay something, and they’re thrilled when there is no charge. And thrilled customers leads to repeat business, referrals, great reviews, and more trust among you and homeowners.

So if you want a distinct selling advantage over your competitors, offer a warranty on broken glass.

It costs the equivalent of pocket lint, and you gain a huge edge on other contractors in your area.

P.S. Want the peace of mind a broken-glass warranty provides customers… but with your marketing? Check out MYM PPC. We promise hot-and-ready leads for a two hundred dollar Cost Per Lead or less.

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